Some Jeeps are Bare-Bones, No-Frills, and Eat Mountains for Breakfast

Practicality is a rare virtue, isn’t it? As evidenced by a recent Jalopnik post, the Jeep DJ was a moribund little vehicle used by the U.S. Postal Service. It had thin sheet metal, barely any curves, and special phone numbers in case you have trouble with dogs.

But we won’t rob Jalopnik of their description of the DJ. Instead, we’ll focus more broadly on the virtue of practicality in a Jeep. Judging by the high number of tweets about mudding, off-roading, taking the doors and tops off of Jeeps, it seems that the straightforward nature of the Jeep is a big draw to many people.

Take the old World War II classic, for example, the Willy:

Photo: Deviant Art

Photo: Deviant Art

It’s an astonishingly rudimentary design with thin sheet metal, hardly a curve on it, and has been made famous in innumerable movies about that time. It could take all sorts of beatings, and was tremendously capable in the field. In 1966, Jeeps like the CJ-5 continued this idea of practicality:

Photo: Speed Hero

Photo: Speed Hero

By the 1980s, Jeep had developed several types of models which could be as Spartan or modern as you wished. But the central idea of being able to traverse any environment, no matter how rugged, was still possible based on a stripped down Jeep, like this Wrangler. We love this heritage.

Photo: V3 Jeep Shop

Photo: V3 Jeep Shop

Today, there are seven Jeep models, the newest of which is the all-new Cherokee. The essential DNA of Jeep remains rugged and minimalist, and the best version of this is the Wrangler and Wrangler Unlimited. Though you can get modern touches like a navigation system and Bluetooth smartphone pairing, you can still traipse about the countryside with stamped steel skid plates, haul out a buddy with forged steel tow hooks, cut through the fog with halogen lamps, and then wash the interior out with a water hose.

Jeeps are made to get dirty. They’re made to ford creeks, crawl around mountains, and sometimes deliver the mail. It’s why they’ve been given tough jobs in the past, and why they’ll get more in the future. When you think practical, think Jeep.

Some Jeeps are Bare-Bones, No-Frills, and Eat Mountains for Breakfast was last modified: December 29th, 2014 by Leith CDJR Aberdeen

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